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is it that they seem to be interested in? it is so obvious. do you think this rule of law has been given on day one and suddenly it was followed? of course not. do not think democracy will solve them. it is both your friend and your enemies. hamilton and madison right the document. it is a very good document. ask any of us on the courts, we would be in agreement on the basic things. the basic framework is it creates institutions of democracy. people can decide for themselves what kinds of community they want it is a special kind of democracy. it is a democracy that protect certain basic human rights that assures some degree of equality. the separation of powers is not what you are looking for here. separation of powers -- he is very clear. you are looking for judicial independence. the separation of powers is both vertical and it is also horizontal. the basic function is not to preserve a rule of law. it is to divide power into pockets. you prevent any group of people from being too powerful. that is the basic purpose. finally, a rule of law. you have a document that is trying to restore democratic
university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is the author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant t
contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order to match the bill from
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the goinsupport othese institutio and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a major winter storm surged into the midwest and northeast, fouling flight schedules and ruining road conditions on this day after christmas. the huge weather system left a trail of destruction in the gulf coast region and at least six people dead. >> oh, wow, oh jesus, look at that tornado. >> ifill: the calm of christmas night was shattered by tornadoes dropping from
in the city, so there is sort of a very, kind of, unique law and relationship around these convenience zones. the crv redempt zones and how they are created and how the state law require that they are managed and facilitated and what this means to small business. so i want to put forward some proactive policy recommendations so that we're being ahead of the curve and not waiting until this may become an issue down the road for small businesses. so i just wanted to just make that clear. this is a policy discussion for you to take a look at, make recommendations. the commission can take action tonight, if it's comfortable or wait until the next commission meeting or two commission meetings. it's at your discretion to make sure that you are comfortable with the policy that is flushed out to be put forward to our policymakers in the city. so i just wanted to make sure that you understood that it's agendized as an action item tonight, but we do that as pro forma, as part of agendizing anything that the commission may be taking action on in case you want to take action tonight, but that is not n
have it in english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've
at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase award given from the president's office given to melissa hard for her work in community service. so i want to acknowledge mullah so hard. [applause] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a dif
legislative power. there will be passing laws until a new parliament takes over next year. even though the president is now relinquishing some power after a newly passed constitution, the council includes 270 members, 90 of whom were appointed over the weekend. >> the upper house continues to pose a problem. it is a sliding majority that raises concerns because we have been looking for important laws that will supplement the constitution. >> the much talked-about demonstration law. they fear it would -- if it has not abated since he took over in june. in a speech on wednesday, the government urged members to focus on laws that will help the country move forward. >> this had been blocked by anti revolutionary forces. i urge you to work on that so we can regain the stolen money inside and out. >> they'll also be addressing the account on wednesday, but the opposition has maintained that they need guarantees, not just words. >> there has been another high- profile defections, the commander of the military police has left the president without his government. they say they turn to gangs of
and graduation. it breeds hypocrisy within the school and encourages a scoff law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonse
.s. families are left in limbo following a law signed in russia banning american families from adopting there. hear from a bay area family who says she isn't giving up hope. >>> good evening i'm ken wayne. >> and i'm maureen naylor. frank and julie are off tonight. we begin with breaking news out of marin county where two people in the last hour have been rescued from the water near the golden gate bridge. coast guard officials tell us they received a call that two people were struggling in the water in this area. rescue boats raced to the site and just about 30 minutes ago coast guard crews pulled two people from the water. there's no word on the victim's identity or their condition. >>> as law enforcement agencies get ready for beefed up dui patrols around the bay area. a lawmaker is proposing a new bill that toughness drunk driving laws. patti lee joins us with details on that plan. >> reporter: there will be multiple dui checkpoints including here in palo alto which will have a command center set up by 9:00 a.m. these are after a bill passed this afternoon will help stop repeat drunk driv
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and we have to educate the adults that spend time with the kids and the federal government will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and looki
perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i
so much. >> she's bundled up. >> coming up a law aimed at making it safer for under aged party goer autos michael finney looks at another new law might help make a -- take away some pain when pulled over by ples. >> taking you laif long the parade route. forks are already staking out claims for best views. >> abc 7 news contin >>> new year brings a new that law that could affect the way some young people celebrate tonight aimed at under age td drinking home of party buses and how two deaths led to this change. >> this new law came about after a 19-year-old was killed jerry hill named the bill for the teenager. hill says the law will hold the party bus driver responsible for under aged drink oogt drivers now of buses if they see, or ignore alcohol being consume bid minors they'll be subject to a misdemeanor. >> another party bus incident occurred this year, a 25-year-old the santa cruz woman was killed after she and a minor fell out of a party bus. the victim died after being run over on highway 17. passengers had been drinking. law requires a chaperone if minors are passengers. to s
to avoid. i'm talking about taxes going up no matter what. taxes in the president's health care law. a new tax on investment income, a tax on medical device mers costing jobs, those aren't the only ones, that last tax forcing companies, many companies to laff workers. and coming attractions for the new year, to ben stein, charles payne, todd soenberger and sarah, charles, you first. >> let the flood gates open. listen, dagen, obviously, we know-- actually we don't know, but it's to nancy pelosi's point we're going find out and i hope we like it. a lot of taxes associated with obamacare. you mentioned the medical device ise, a l of these companies, by the way, medical device comnies have been laying off worrs right now. and that is, if this impacts, by the way, everyone, takes away from research and development, which will take away from life saving innovation and it's just, again, the very tip of the iceberg. ultimately, there's going to be ahole lot of taxes that just opens the gate for. this is just the beginning. >> ben, even if you look at action taken by the mical device makers, ther
in domestic violence investigation; there was a time when law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across th
is that the law and order and it's hard to keep up with that if everyone is pulling out of pistol. >> host: even in shootout at ok corral. >> guest: is started up because site claims it had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that for big carrying a firearm around town. incidentally the understanding of work on race were four began to evolve in the century and in particular this. in the early 19th century was a big problem with tools between gentlemen. the most famous is between aaron burr and hamilton. but this tooling was fairly common, but it was frowned upon and could be prosecuted and burr had to keep it around to avoid being prosecuted. and so, one of the means that the people who insisted on being able to settle matters of honor on the spot dirty to do in the early 19th century was carry small pistols concealed. this was seen by gentlemen as cowardly. if you cannot be a man can wear your pistol on your hip and don't sneakily carry it around and say turcotte. so that began to change. >> host: was still holds true today. most places don't have restrictions on open carr
history is and how important it is to know. [applause] >> next from the georgetown university law center in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about one hour and ten minutes. >> hello, everyone. i want to welcome you to today's program, which features an all-star lineup of authors who will be discussing their most recent books on the supreme court. i am a professor here at georgetown and executive director of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event and i would like to thank our deputy director for putting it all together. before i turn the program over to our moderator i would like to remind everyone that after the program we have a reception following in which he will get a chance to have all of your newly purchased books signed by the authors and have a word or two with the authors hopefully coming in as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderator for today's program. tony really needs no introduction at all sali w
laws and they just took a affect today. and we will tell you about one that affects you if you use facebook. >> reporter: well there are a total of 876 new laws in the books in our state and one is designed to protect homeowners trying to avoid foreclosure. this new law would prevent banks from starting the foreclosure basis and it will protect people going through alone modification. and you can still go ahead with the for close to our some time. it is now illegal to use facebook user i.d. and password to keep their jobs. colleges and user add mixes are also prohibited in doing the same thing and can no longer ask the students. driver less cars, pay paves the way and they are a bay area technical giant and as long as there is a real person watching nearby incase of an emergency. with more than 800 new laws, we can't go through all of them but these are just a few we have picked out but coming up in about 45 minutes we will tell you about a new law that has to do with carrying rifles in public. allie rasmus, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> thank you, alley. they are preparing a vi
't. though we may not know in any particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, ho
sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle th
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
or not they should pay the bills that they've already wracked up through the laws they passed. let me repeat, we can't not pay bills that we've already incurred. if congress refuses to give the united states government the ability to pay these bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy would be catastrophic. far worse than the impact of a fiscal cliff. people will remember back in 2011, the last time this course of action was threatened, our entire recovery was put at risk. consumer confidence plunged, business investment plunged, growth dropped. we can't go down that path again. >> the president draws a line on one of the upcoming fights. joining us now is mike allen to review a little bit about what happened yesterday. mike, we were not sure there would be a vote at some point. obviously the house felt a bit jammed by the senate. did mitch mcconnell jam john boehner and force boehner's hand? >> he didn't force boehner's hand, but he did step up in a way that boehner didn't. people will tell you on capitol hill boehner's nerve never looked weaker, here's why. for most of the day
click on whetheather. >> there will be a bunch of new laws in maryland. kim dacey has more with what we can expect. >> on tuesday, a dozen new state laws will go into effect. some were highly discussed. others you might not know about. one allows gay couples to marry as of january 1. another new law states baltimore city elections will now be held in the same cycle as the presidential elections. that means current officials will get an extra year in office. for veterans, the department of veterans affairs will be required to give out their status. another new law will make it easier to protect kids and disabled adults from identity theft.. a parent or guardian can freeze their credit report. advocates say they hope it will protect foster children. they are especially vulnerable. >> we are hoping that the credit bureaus and the department of human resources will be able to get to some data sharing so they can freeze them or stall them as well as help them to get access to their credit report. >> maryland is the first state to pass a law allowing minors the ability to freeze their credit
for reelection and into 2016. another law allows a parent do it freeze credit reports to protect their children from identity theft. advocates to push for it helps the law will protect foster children who they say are especially vulnerable. for more information, go to wbaltv.com. one of the state's most ofly contest a loss -- most holty contest allows went into affect. gay marriage became legal. a lot of couples lined up to tie the knot. bells rang in the new year everytwhere. said michael, the archangel catholic church, celebrated its first same-sex couple wedding ceremony. >> jesus loves everyone. i think he would be here celebrating with us if you were walking the earth today. i do not look at it as a religious issue. i look at it as a ♪ civil rights issuea il rights issue. >> amanda and her partner exchanged wedding vows. they included four foster children they plan to adopt. >> it is the best day of our lives. we finally get to be part of marriage. >> they rode their wedding vows. their first give to each other, a single rose, symbolizing love, respect, and caring. exchanged rings. arch
laws. >> kim dacey has more on what to expect. >> on tuesday, a dozen new state laws will go into effect. some were highly discuss. one allows gay couples to marry as of january 1. baltimore city elections will now be held in the same cycle as the presidential elections. for veterans, the department of veterans affairs will be required to give out something of their status. another new law will make it easier to protect kids and disabled -- a parent or guardian can freeze their credit report. advocates say they hope will protect foster children. >> we are hoping that the credit bureaus and the department of human resources will be able to get to some data sharing so they can freeze them or stall them as well as help them to get access to their credit report. >> maryland is the first state to pass bill law allowing minors the ability to freeze their credit reports. kim dacey, wbal-tv 11 news. >> 37 degrees at 5:06. a petition growing against a church group. >> george h.w. bush takes a turn for the worse. >> this is a live picture on the west side. it looks pretty good here. >>
services organizations get to regularly meet with law enforcement and learn about their experience. i really appreciate officer hall who is also in eric chang's position; our organization has been involved with this commission for six years. while we have made lots of progress distilled is appointed that on a regular basis, almost every day, i will talk to someone who said that they did not know that they could have an interpreter. they were not offered an interpreter. they did not even get to speak to the police officer on the scene because there was no interpreter or they have to wait an hour or something along those lines and when you think about for survivor, even if they know they will get to have an interpreter, if they have to wait whether an hour or 45 minutes and during that time the officer is talking probably to the abusive partner, it changes the dynamic. the police come in but they're not always 100 percent sure that calling the police in the situation is going to be the most successful route. and then you have is a situation where they're not able to c
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suppression. our next guest defense the tough voter id law say it is a paramount important that we protect the integrity of the process and make sure voter irregularities and voter fraud is eliminating. joining us now, attorney general of south carolina, great to have you with us.at first, your reaction to what the first lady had to sy. >> i obviously disagree with the first lady.with in every state i looked at, georgia, indiana are two states, section five, one is not a section five states. when they have had laws with a federal id for theoter registration card actually minority that is a went up in subsequent elections and participation.s. lou: when you talk about the five states, those are states because of civil rights transgressions 60 years ago, 50 years ago, they still remain under the watchful eye of the justice department for a revision in their electoral laws or procedures, right?pro >> absolutely. states have asked the federal government permission before they can implement a law thathe affects elections, but in a state passing a law, that she, went up in a state of georgia, up
's not done yet, he's okay. and new controversial immigration gun law coming up. can the mexican government have a say how the u.s. deals with illegal immigration? we'll talk to arizona attorney general tom thorn, he weighs in on the ongoing legal battle. >> jamie: plus, a defiant act against president obama's health care law. an update on the u.s. company facing millions of dollars in fines for refusing to comply. >> kelly: and taking a stand in the wake of the tragic school shooting massacre at sandy hook elementary. what some teachers are doing to make their classrooms safer. >> i think that a lot of people have a fear of guns and of what they can do, but i think also that maybe they're not quite educated, that sometimes the only thing we'll talk about is a good guy with a gun. >> and welcome back, everyone, we're following a major challenge to the president's health care law, the arts and crafts chain hobby lobby now saying it will not pro he vied workers with health plans that cover the morning after pill. even though the new health care law requires it. this, after the supreme court
it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's p
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
for the state department and he was going to graduate in a year with a dual law and mba degree, the type of person where it just doesn't even run through your head he's having a problem because he does so well. >> stuart bridge was a close friend of ben's. they met in grammar school. ben told stuart that he and his new gir girlfriend had tried oxycodone and they thought it was no big deal. >> it's not something that i'm seeking out, but it's something i've tried. >> anyone else might just shrug off that conversation. but bridge wasn't just a friend. he's also a doctor. and he warned ben about taking oxycodone and about mixing it with alcohol. >> i have seen people die who are on these medications or who oh have experimenteded with these medications. >> the line between experimentation and death, it turns out, is tenuous. oxycodone and other pain killers like it are what's called central nervous system or cns depressants. they slow down the body's vital functions, breathing, heart rate, blood pressure. that's not usually a problem when the pills are prescribed for you. but when you add t
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